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CHINESE COINS & CURRENCY

All items guaranteed to be genuine.  I have over 40 years experience with Chinese coins and buy only from reliable suppliers in the United States.


EARLY ANCIENT CHINESE COIN  Ancient Chinese Pan Liang coin, 140-118BC

The Pan Liang (Ban Liang) was the first unified currency of China.  It was a cast round uniface copper coin with a square hole with the two characters "Pan Liang", which roughly translates as "half ounce"  The coin was introduced about 210BC with a weight of 12 Shu. About 175BC it was officially reduced to 4 Shu, then later to 3 Shu.  The basic design of a round, cast coin with a square hole became the standard that China continued to use for over 2000 years!  Considering its age, it is a remarkably inexpensive coin.
Item CN-PAN CHINA, PAN LIANG 175-118BC (Scj. 107+) Fine  $12.50


THE REMARKABLE WU-CH'U COIN 

Ancient Chinese Wu Shu coin, 118BC - circa 500ADIn 118BC Emperor Yuan-shou withdrew the Pan-Liang coin and introduced a new coin, called the Wu Ch'u (Wu Zhu) worth 5 Shu.  Unlike the earlier Pan Liang coins it had a raised rim to prevent filing.  The coin proved quite popular, and except for the Wang Mang interregnum, it continued to be issued in various versions for the next six centuries!  Now that is significant monetary stability.
Item CN-WU CHINA WU-CH'U COIN 118BC - circa 500AD (Scj.114+) F-VF $7.00



THE DISASTROUS REIGN OF WANG MANG

CHINA WANG MANG 50 CASH COIN (TA CH'IEN WU SHIH) 7-14AD Scj.120+CHINA WANG MANG HOU CH'UAN COIN 14-23AD Scj.149+Wang Mang arranged to have himself appointed regent for the young Han Emperor in 7AD. Two years later he killed the boy and usurped the throne.  He attempted major reforms of China's economy, many of which were attempted by the communists in the 1950's, These included  the abolition of slavery, introduction of an income tax, redistribution of the land, institution of price controls, and confiscation of gold.  He demonetized existing coins and instituted new ones based on an unbacked fiat coinage. Despite the execution and exile of thousands, the reforms were not accepted. The economy collapsed; there were widespread general strikes and massive starvation. In 23AD Wang was slain, his "reforms" were abolished and the Han dynasty restored. We offer the following two unusual coins issued by Wang Mang: The first is a Ta Ch'ien Wu Shih coin, which he introduced in 7AD.   Though only slightly heavier than the old Wu Ch'u coins, it was worth 50 Wu Ch'u.  As might be expected the merchants did not take too kindly to this new coin.  In 14AD the value of the Ta Chi'en Wu Shih coin was reduced in value from 50 Cash to 1 Cash.  The same year he introduced a new coin, called a Hou Ch'uan.. The coin remained in use until after his death, when the Wu Ch’u was restored as the standard circulating coin of China.
Item CN-TA-CH'IEN CHINA WANG MANG 50 CASH COIN (TA CH'IEN WU SHIH) 7-14AD Scj.120+ VF $12.00
Item CN-HOU-CHUAN CHINA WANG MANG HOU CH'UAN COIN 14-23AD Scj.149+ Fine $7.50




FAMOUS K'AI YUAN COIN OF THE TANG DYNASTY 

China 1 Cash K'ai Yuan coin of Tang Dynasty The K'ai Yuan coin was introduced by Chinese Emperor Kao Tsu, who founded the Tang Dyansty in 618AD.  The coins replaced the previously used Wu-Chu and other coins.  The high quality of the coins and excellent calligraphy set a standard for Chinese coins for the next 1000 years!   The legend on the coin, K'ai Yuan Tung Pao translates as "precious currency of the K'ai Yuan era".   The Tang Dynasty was a brilliant period in Chinese history.  It was an era of great prosperity and artistry.   The K'ai Yuan coin continued to be issued for the next 300 years, until the collapse of the Dynasty in 907AD.   During much of the dynasty the coin was the only denomination struck.  Because of the relatively low value of the coin and the high level of commerce a LOT of the coins were issued during that period. (Think of doing all your transactions with only pennies!)   As a result the coin, though over 1000 years old, is still plentiful and inexpensive.
Item CN-KAI CHINA K'AI YUAN 1 CASH COIN 618-907AD Scj. 312+ Fine-VF $4.50
Item CN-KAIx10 10 PIECES OF CHINA K'AI YUAN 1 CASH COIN 618-907AD Fine-VF $25.00
Item CN-KAIx25 25 PIECES OF CHINA K'AI YUAN 1 CASH COIN 618-907AD Fine-VF $49.50



ATTRACTIVE LARGE COIN OF CHINA’S NORTHERN SONG DYNASTY

China, Chong Ning 5 Cash coin, 1102-1106AD Scj. 622-623The Northern (Pei) Song (Sung) Dynasty came to power in 960AD.  China prospered under its wise Emperors. In 1101 Emperor Hui Zong (Hui Tsung) came to power.  A cultured man, poet, painter and avid patron of the arts, he spent vast sums collecting art, supporting artists, and building a costly imperial garden.   He neglected the affairs of state.  The civil service became increasingly corrupt, the army weak, and the treasury bankrupt. The Emperor allied himself with the increasingly powerful Jin (Chin Tarters) of Manchuria to attack and destroy the neighboring Liao Kingdom.  The Jin (Chin), then turned against him and succeeded in sacking and destroying the weakened Song Dynasty.  Hui Zong was captured, along with most of the Imperial Court, and died in exile in Manchuria.
    In 1102 Hui Zong began to issue this attractive, large (32 to 35mm) copper 10 Cash coin (some references call it a 5 Cash) using the reign title Chong Ning (Ch'ung Ning). The coins had far less copper than five one cash coins, so brought in substantial extra revenue for the government.  As might be expected, this devalued money drove the good money out of circulation which caused a severe coin shortage.  The public outcry caused the Emperor to discontinue the coins by 1106AD.  It is an attractive coin from a cultured, but inept, Emperor of China.
Item CN-S622 CHINA 10 CASH CHONG NING 1102-1106AD ORTHODOX SCRIPT Scj. 622-623 VF $15.00




NEWUNIDENTIFIED MEDIEVAL CHINESE CASH COINS

Medieval Chinese Cash coinsWe were finally able to find another batch of old unsorted, unidentified Chinese cash coins. They are getting hard to obtain because of the idiotic policies by our government.  The U.S. government considers Chinese cash coins to be a rare cultural item and are thus illegal to import, even though they are available by the millions and are sold legally and openly in China.  Luckily, we found a small hoard that was imported some years ago, when there were not so many idiots in our government.   Folks have fun sorting, identifying and cataloging them.  And they are remarkably cheap considering their age. Most are Tang (618-907AD) or Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127AD), though there may others as well.   Most grade VG to VF.  To assist you in identifying the coins we have an identification booklet "OLD COINS OF CHINA" by Holgar Jorgensen listed below.
Item CASHx25 25 MIXED MEDIEVAL CHINESE CASH COINS $25.00
Item CASHx100 100 MIXED MEDIEVAL CHINESE CASH COINS $95.00




Book: Old Coins of China by Holger Jorgensen. Chinese cash coin identification guideOLD COINS OF CHINA by Holger Jorgensen

A small but complete identification guide book for Chinese cash coins from 600BC to 1912AD. Best book if you just want to identify Chinese cash coins by emperor and date without going into varieties. Features line drawings of coins with reign title and reign dates, but not much further information.   Reprint. 26 pages and plates. 5.5" x 8.5",  softcover.
Item BK-Jorgensen Book: OLD COINS OF CHINA by Holger Jorgensen $6.00



OLD CHINESE LOTTERY LOAN BOND

China 1926 Lottery Loan Bond for Port of Whampoa
The Republic of China issued this 5 Dollar Second Nationalist Government Lottery Loan bond in 1926 to raise money to finance improvements in the Port of Whampoa in Canton, (now Pazou, a section of Guangzhou).  Rather than pay interest the bonds were automatically entered into a tri-monthly lottery that paid prizes from $1,000 to $50,000. This made the bonds popular with the Chinese, who are natural gamblers.  The front of the bond is in Chinese, the reverse in English.  Both the front and back are underprinted with a map of the port. The bonds specify that they are denominated  as "5 Dollars Canton Currency".  At the time the bond was issued China was involved in a three-way civil war between Northern China, Southern China and the Communists, each issuing its own currency, so it was necessary to specify which exactly Chinese currency.   The bond measures about 7 1/4" x 5" (18cm x 13cm).
Item BND-CN26-5D CHINA 5 DOLLARS 1926 LOTTERY LOAN BOND, VF-XF $10.00




1938 CHINESE WAR BOND DEPICTS AIR AND SEA BATTLES

Kwangtung, China 5 Dollar 1938 Defense bond with coupons
Vignette of naval battle on 1938 Kwangtung, China Defense bondVignette of air battle on 1938 Kwangtung, China Defense bond
This 1938 5 Dollar Chinese War bond include two wonderful vignettes.  One showing an aerial dogfight, the other depicting costal gun emplacements blasting ships offshore.  The bond was issued by Kwangtung Province of China in March 1938 to raise funds in a desperate attempt to stop the Japanese invasion of China.  By the time the bonds were issued, Japan had already begun an naval and aerial blockade of Canton (now Guangzhou), the capital of Kwangtung Province (now Guangzhou).  Beijing, Shanghai and the national capital of Nanjing had already fallen to the Japanese.  The defense of Canton failed and the city fell to the Japanese in December 1938. The bonds are labeled in Chinese "27th year Kwangtung Province National Defense Public Bond" and paid a 4% interest.  Only the first three coupons on each bond have been clipped.  The bond measures approximately 10.5"x12.5" (26x31.5cm) and is blue. It is an important item issued during the Japanese invasion of China.
Item BND-CN39-$5 KWANGTUNG CHINA, 1938 $5 DEFENSE BOND, XF $39.95





NewJAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY FOR CHINA

5 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA OVERPRINTED ON BANK OF JAPAN NOTE PM245 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA OVERPRINTED ON MODIFIED JAPANESE NOTE PM2510 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA OVERPRINTED ON MODIFIED JAPANESE NOTE PM2750 SEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA
Japan  issued Military Currency starting in 1938 for use in the areas of China that they occupied. Because civilians were forced to accept the Military Yen, which was not backed and could not be exchanged into Japanese Yen, it cost the Japanese government virtually nothing to purchase whatever they wanted. The initial issues of Military currency were created by overprinting Japanese homeland notes by putting a red line through the "Bank of Japan Convertible Silver Note" at the front, another line through the Bank of Japan seal on the back putting four large "Military Note" characters on both sides.  The next issue used modified homeland notes that did not have the the Bank of Japan inscriptions or seals.  Later notes were issued for China with the inscription Imperial Japanese Government without the Military note overprint.   The 50 Sen note depicts a dragon on the front and inscriptions on the back.
Item PM-CN-5Y-OVPT1 5 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA ON BANK OF JAPAN NOTE PM24 F $6.00
Item PM-CN-5Y-OVPT2 5 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA ON MODIFIED JAPANESE NOTE PM25 F $3.00
Item PM-CN-10Y-OVPT2 10 YEN JAPANESE MILITARY NOTE FOR CHINA ON MODIFIED JAPANESE NOTE PM27 F $5.00
Item PM-CN-50S 50 SEN JAPANESE IMPERIAL NOTE FOR CHINA PM14 VG $3.00




HISTORIC BANK OF CHINA CURRENCY

The Bank of China is the oldest and one of the largest banks in China.  It was founded in 1905 and was named Bank of China in 1912. It was one of four major note issuing banks for the Republic of China.  It currently issues banknotes for both Hong Kong and Macao. It is one of the only banks in the world to issue currency for three different realms.  

THE BANK OF CHINA'S CURSED BUILDING


China, Bank of China, 5 & 10 Yuan 1937 P80 & P81
In 1930 The Bank of China began to construct a new 34-story headquarters on the Bund in Shanghai.  It was built on property that had been confiscated from the Germans during World War I. Perhaps a departing German cursed the property.   It was to be the highest building in the Far East. However, Britisher Victor Sassoon, the owner of the Sassoon House (now Fairmont Peace Hotel) located next door, demanded that no building be higher than his.  The municipal government, under British control, limited the height of the bank building giving it a chopped off appearance.  In 1937 the building was topped out at a height of 15 stories and the bank issued new banknotes to mark the occasion.  The back of the notes depict the Bank of China building along with a partial image of the Sasson House on the left and the Yokohama Specie Bank the right.. The front depicts Sun Yat Sen and have a watermark of the Temple of Heaven.  Unfortunately, the war with Japan broke out the same year which delayed the completion and move into the building.  The bank was not able to move into the building until 1946. In 1949 the bank was nationalized by the Chinese communists. The notes were printed by Thomas De La Rue in London.
Item PM-CN-BOC37 BANK OF CHINA 5 & 10 YUAN NOTES 1937 P80 & P81 XF $5.00

BANK OF CHINA CURRENCY FOR HONG KONG AND MACAU

Hong Kong - Bank of China 20 Dollars banknote, 2015 P341eMacau Banco da China 10 Patacas banknote 2008 P108
After World War II most of the Bank of China was nationalized by the People's Republic of China, which operates it as a government owned commercial bank. Ahead of China's takeover of Hong Kong and Macau, China insisted that the Bank of China be allowed to issue banknotes for both territories. It is one of three banks that issues currency for Hong Kong and one of two banks issuing currency for Macau. This 2015 Bank of China 20 Dollar note for Hong Kong note depicts Bauhinia flowers and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong on the front.  The distinctive building was designed by I. M. Pei and was the tallest building in Hong Kong when it opened in 1990.  The back of the note portrays the shore of Repulse Bay.  The note includes braille to assist the blind and many security devices including, microprinting, watermark, security thread, SPARK (an optically variable magnetic ink) and iridescent ink.  The Bank of China Macau 10 Pataca note dated 2008 features the A-Ma temple on the front.  Built in 1488, the temple is one of the oldest in Macau and thought to be the settlement's namesake. The back depicts the Bank of China Building in Macau.  It is the second highest building in Macau.  The bank's name is in Portuguese "Banco da China"
Item PM-HK-BOC20-15 BANK OF CHINA HONG KONG 20 DOLLARS NOTE 2015 P341e UNC. out
Item PM-MO-BOC10-08 BANK OF CHINA MACAU 10 PATACAS NOTE 2008 P108 UNC. $6.00




UNUSUAL FIBER COINS FROM WWII JAPANESE OCCUPATION OF CHINA  

Manchukuo 5 Fen 1944-1945 Red Fiber YA13aManchukuo 1 Fen 1945 Y13a "red fiber"
Manchukuo was a Japanese puppet state carved out of Northeastern China prior to World War II.  Due to a severe metal shortage towards the end of the war, it issued these unusual 1 Fen and 5 Fen coins struck in a thick, red material rather than metal. The coins are dated in the year of the reign of Emperor Kang Te of Manchukuo.   Kang Te was formerly known as Pu Yi, who was the last Emperor of China until he was deposed in 1911. The Japanese used him as the figurehead leader for Manchukuo.  The 1 Fen struck only a single year; 1945.  The 5 Fen was struck in 1944 and 1945. Because the material used was relatively soft, the coins show considerable wear. These historic World War II coins are some of the few circulating non-metallic coins of the 20th century.  
Item MAN-5F MANCHUKUO 5 FEN 1944-45 YA13a G-VG $7.00
Item MAN-1F MANCHUKUO 1 FEN 1945 Y13a G-VG $7.00



NEWSCARCE CHINA 5000 CUSTOM GOLD UNITS 1948 BANKNOTE

China 5000 Custom Gold Units (1948) banknote P361The Republic of China introduced the Custom Gold Unit in 1930 to assist in paying import duties.  It was originally valued at 40 United States Cents and was fully backed by silver.  By 1942 it ceased to be used to pay custom duties, was no longer backed by silver and entered general circulation with the value of 1 Custom Gold Unit equal to 20 Chinese Yuan (Chinese Dollars).  Following World War II, China suffered from increasing inflation produced Custom Gold Units in ever higher denominations.  This 5000 Custom Gold Unit note was issued in 1948.  The following year China fell to the communists.  The vertical, undated, purple note features Sun Yat Sen on the front and the Shanghai Custom House on the back.  The note was printed by China's Central Printing Works and is 64x153mm.
Item PM-CN-5000CGU CHINA 5000 CUSTOM GOLD UNITS NOTE P361 AU-UNC. $18.00





CHINA CELEBRATES HIGH SPEED RAIL

China 10 Yuan 2018 High Speed Rail bi-metallic coinChina has the world's longest and most extensive high speed rail network, covering almost 17,000 miles (27,000 km.).  China issued this 2018 dated 27mm bi-metallic 10 Yuan to commemorate the nation's high speed rail network.  The reverse of the coin depicts a "Fuxing" high-speed train, Dashengguan Yangtze River Bridge and the Beijing South Railway Station.  The Fuxing trains run at speeds of 155 to 215 mph (250 to 350 km/h).  The obverse features the arms of the People's Republic of China and the date.
Item CN-RAIL18 CHINA 10 YUAN 2018 HIGH SPEED RAIL, BI-METAL BU $7.00



PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA CELEBRATES 70th ANNIVERSARY restocked

China 10 Yuan 2019 70th AnniversaryThe People's Republic of China issued this 2019 bi-metallic 10 Yuan coin to commemorate its 70th anniversary.  One side features a large "70" with the national emblem and the dates "1949 - 2019" within the "0". The other side depicts the national emblem within a garland of flowers.
Item CN-10Y19-70 CHINA 10 YUAN 2019 70th ANNIVERSARY, UNC. $6.00



NEW 2019 CIRCULATING COINS OF CHINA

China 1 Jiao, 5 Jiao, 1 Yuan 2019, ObversesChina 1 Jiao, 5 Jiao, 1 Yuan 2019, Reverses
The People's Republic of China recently released new versions of the 1 and 5 Jiao and 1 Yuan coins with updated designs. All three coins continue to feature flowers on the reverse.  The size of the 1 Yuan is reduced from 25mm to 22.5mm.  The numeral "1" incorporates latent image of “” and “1”.  The coin has a lettered edge with "RMB" repeated three times.  The metallic content of the 5 Jiao is changed to nickel-plated steel, the typeface of the denomination revised and the orchid blossoms on the reverse scaled down.  The numeral on the 1 Jiao was also revised and the orchid on the reverse scaled down.    
Item CN-SET19 CHINA 3 COIN SET, 1 JIAO - 1 YUAN 2019, UNC. $3.00



MULTI-LINGUAL NOTE OF CHINA FEATURES POTALA PALACE IN TIBET

 China 50 Yuan banknote, 2005 P906 Chairman Mao / Potala Palace
Mao Zedong is featured on the front of this 2005 dated 50 Yuan note from China. The 170 x 50m note also includes a watermark of Mao.  The back depicts the Potala Palace in Lhasa in Tibet. It was the winter palace of the Dalai Lamas and the seat of the Tibet government from 1649 to 1959. It has been a museum since then and is a World Heritage Site.  The 13-story building contains over 1000 rooms, 10,000 shrines and about 200,000 statues.  Also on the back is the denomination written out in Mandarin Pinyin, Mongol, Tibetan, Uighur and Zhuang as well as English. 
Item PM-CN-50Y CHINA 50 YUAN NOTE 2005 P906 UNC. $15.00





NEWSQUARE CHINESE 2020 5 YUAN COMMEMORATES THE WUYI MOUNTAINS

China 5 Yuan 2020 Mount Wuyi square coinChina continued their annual series featuring UNESCO heritage sites with this square 2020 5 Yuan honoring the Wuyi mountains.   Wuyi is a range of mountains around the border of Fujian and Jiangxi provinces.  It is noted for its spectacular scenery, many caves, diverse plant and wildlife that includes more than 1000 rare species as well has many historical and religious sites.  One side of the 27.2mm brass coin depicts the distinctive Yunnu hill, a butterfly and two men on a raft on the Nine-bend River.  The other side portrays the emblem of the People's Republic of China. The design incorporates a number of anti-counterfeiting devices, including a shifting image and a series of tiny dots hidden in in the design.
Item CN-WUYI CHINA 5 YUAN 2020 MOUNT WUYI BU $7.50



NEWCHINA YEAR OF THE OX BI-METALLIC 10 YUAN

China year of the ox bi-metallic 10 Yuan coinChina recently released this 2021 dated bi-metallic 10 Yuan coin to commemorate the Year of the ox.  The bi-metallic 27mm coin depicts a traditional artistic paper-cutting of an ox, a palace lantern and grain on the reverse. The obverse features the denomination surrounded by an intricate etched design. The large number 10 contains latent images which change from "R M B" to "10 10 10" when the coin is moved. The design also features micro-letters in the base of the numeral "1" and other anti-counterfeiting devices. 
Item CN-OX21 CHINA 10 YUAN 2021 YEAR OF THE OX, BI-METAL BU $8.00




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