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CHINESE COINS & CURRENCY

All coins guaranteed to be genuine.  I have over 30 years experience with Chinese coins and buy only from reliable suppliers in the United States.

THE REMARKABLE WU-CH'U COIN 

Ancient Chinese Wu Shu coinIn 118BC Emperor Yuan-shou withdrew the Pan-Liang coin and introduced a new coin, called the Wu Ch'u (Wu Shu or Wu Chu)  It had a value of 5 Shu.  Unlike the earlier Pan Liang coins it had a raised rim to prevent filing.  The coin proved quite popular, and continued to be issued in various versions for the next six centuries!
Item CN-WU CHINA WU-CH'U COIN 118BC - 618AD (Scj.114+) VG-VF  $6.00




A WORD ABOUT THE NAMES OF CHINESE EMPERORS

 The names of Chinese emperors can be confusing - because one Emperor will have many names.  Like everyone, they have personal name, but that is often different than their birth name.  Once they become emperor however,  the emperor choses a reign title.  The reign title is the name that appears on their coins.  Some emperors used one reign title for their entire reign.  Others would change their reign title every few years. Some reign title would be used by more than one emperor.  In addition, after an emperor died he was given a posthumous name, which often was long enough to read like an entire sentence. 

Adding the confusion is that there are multiple ways of translating the same name.  Most traditional English language references used the Wade-Giles transcription.  Many recent books use the modern Pinyin transcription.  Thus the emperor who ruled China from 1022 to 1063AD is known as Jen Tsung in the Wade-Giles transcription and Ren Zong in the Pinyin transcription. He used nine reign titles during his reign.   His reign titles in the Wade-Giles transcription are T'ien-Sheng, Ming-tao, Ching-yu, Pao-yuan, K'ang-ting, Ch'ing-li, Huang-yu, Chih-ho, and Chia-yu.  In the Pinyin transcription that is Tian Sheng, Ming Dao, Jing You, Huang Song, Kang Ding, Huang You, Zhi He and Jia You.  His birth name (using Pinyin) was Zhao Zhen.  His Posthumous name (using Pinyin) is Emperor Titian Fadao Jigong Quande Shenwen Shengwu Ruizhe Mingxiao, but that is too long for anyone to use!

 For the purposes of these coins, I will usually refer to both the reign title that appears on the coin (as that is what is used by most collectors of Chinese coins), and the common personal name that the emperor is known by in the history books.  I will usually include both the Wade-Giles and Pinyin transcription.




LUCKY COIN OF THE FIRST MANCHU EMPEROR OF CHINA 

China 1 Cash coin of Manchu Emperor Shun Chih (Shunzhi)In 1644, the collapsing Ming Dynasty invited the Manchu army to put down a peasant uprising that had taken over their capital city of Beijing.   The Manchu’s promptly did so, but took over the city for themselves, and placing their young Emperor Shun Chih (Shunzhi) upon the throne of China, bringing a formal end to the Ming Dynasty.  By the time Shun Chih died of smallpox in 1662 the Manchu Dynasty was firmly in control of China.  The coins of Shun Chih were thought to bring good luck.  Probably because wearing the coin around the neck was a way of showing support for the new Dynasty, thus currying favor with government officials, while not having the coin could invite harassment.  We have a selection of these old brass one cash coins from various mints.  The Emperors title ison one side, while the name of the mint is on the other.
Item CN-SHUNZHI CHINA 1 CASH SHUN CHIH 1644-1662 F-VF $7.00


INEXPENSIVE 200 YEAR OLD MANCHU DYNASTY COIN

China 1 Cash coin of Qianlong Emperor (1735-1796)Ch'ien Lung (Qianlong Emperor) was the fourth emperor of the Ch'ing (Manchu) Dynasty, and one of the longest reigning emperors in the thousands of years of Chinese history.  His reign lasted from 1735 until 1796.  His military campaigns strengthened Chinese authority both within the Empire and over its neighbors.  He created a new province, Sinkiang Province, in north-western China, substantially increasing the size of the Empire. He had 17 sons and 10 daughters by his concubines.  He was also a patron of the arts.  He resigned in 1796, turning the Empire over to his fifth son and died in 1799.  This brass 1 cash coin of Ch'ien Lung features the Emperors title on one side and the mint mark on the reverse. The coins are genuine, and despite being over 200 years old, they are quite inexpensive. Many hundreds of millions of coins were made during his long and prosperous reign.  The coin has long been popular with practitioners of Feng Shui and I Ching.
Item CN-CL CHINA CH'IEN LUNG 1 CASH 1735-1796 Fine $2.00


LAST CASH COIN OF THE LAST EMPEROR OF CHINA

Chinese cash coin of Pu-I 1909-1911 Pu I, also known by his reign title Hsuan-t'ung (Xuan Tong) ascended to the throne of China in 1908 at age three, upon the death of his Uncle, the previous emperor.  By this time however Imperial rule was already collapsing due to repeated wars, foreign interference and internal misrule. In 1911 the Republic of China was established and he was forced to abdicate the throne.  This small one cash coin of Hsuan-t'ung was one of the last cast square hole cash coins to be issued by Imperial China. The coin was minted at the Board of Revenue Mint in Peking.
Item CN-C1-19 CHINA 1 CASH HSIEN TUNG 1908-1911 C1-19.1 VF $9.50



Book: Old Coins of China by Holger Jorgensen (reprint)OLD COINS OF CHINA by Holger Jorgensen

A small but complete identification guide book for Chinese cash coins from 600BC to 1912AD. Best book if you just want a to identify Chinese cash coins by emperor without going into varieties. Features line drawings of coins.   Reprint. 26 pages and plates.  softcover. $6.00
Item BK-Jorgensen Book: OLD COINS OF CHINA by Holger Jorgensen $6.00



OLD REPUBLIC OF CHINA LOTTERY LOAN BONDS

CHINA 1926 LOTTERY LOAN BONDCHINA 1927 LOTTERY LOAN BOND
During the 1920’s The Republic of China issued these 5 Dollar Lottery Loan bonds.  Rather than pay interest, the bonds were automatically entered into a monthly lottery that paid prizes from $1000 to $50,000.  The terms of the bonds are listed on the front in Chinese, and on the back in English.  We have two of these unusual bonds.  The Second Nationalist Government Lottery Loan Bond of 1926 was issued to finance improvements in the Port of Whampoa, near Canton (now Guangzhou).  Both the front and the back are underprinted with a map of the port.   The Nationalist Government Lottery Loan Bond of 1927 pictures Sun Yat Sen and the flags of the Kuomintang party and The Republic of China.  The bond was issued to pay for “subsidizing the Canton-Hong Kong Strikers Committee and the unemployed workers in general”  The Canton-Hong Kong Strike was a massive strike and boycott supported by the government of China against Hong Kong and British imperialism. It was sparked on May 30, 1925 police under British command opened fire on Chinese demonstrators, killing at least 9 and wounding many more. It greatly expanded the following month after British troops killed and wounded even more Chinese demonstrators.  Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek initially used the movement to encourage nationalist fervor and create support for his government. . The Chinese began a boycott of all British trade and general strike of all Chinese in Hong Kong. Hundreds of thousands of Chinese left Hong Kong, paralyzing the city.  Thousands of protestors were brought into Canton to drum up additional support.   The strike was formally ended on October 10, 1926.  Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek wanted to divert resources to his Northern Expedition against the warlords in order to unify China under his control.  The British, wanting to regain their profitable Chinese trade, provided China with loans and agreed to allow China to levy a 2.5% import duty on all imports coming through Kwangtung (now Guangdong) Province as well certain other duties on imports and exports.  The British loans helped finance Chiang Kai-shek’s Northern Expedition.  The 2.5% import duty was used to pay off these 1927 Lottery Loan bonds which were issued to cover the costs of the strike incurred by the Chinese government.   The bonds measure about 7 1/4" x 5" (18cm x 13cm) and grade Very Fine or better.
Item PM-CN-BOND26 CHINA 1926 LOTTERY LOAN BOND VF-XF $15.00
Item PM-CN-BOND27 CHINA 1927 LOTTERY LOAN BOND VF-XF $18.00


3 UNUSUAL OLD CHINESE BANKNOTES

China 5 & 10 Customs Gold Units, 1930 & 100 Yuan 1940
These 3 notes were issued by China during the 1930’s and 1940’s. The set includes two unusual vertical notes issued by The Central Bank of China:  the 5 and 10 Customs Gold Units (CGU) note dated 1930.  The Customs Gold Units was originally intended to pay customs duties and was tied to the price of gold. In 1942 they were put into general circulation. The bank’s headquarters in Shanghai is pictured on the back.  Also included in the set is the Bank of China 100 Yuan note dated 1940 bearing the “CHUNGKING” overprint on the back.  The Temple of Heaven is on the back. All three notes were printed by the American Banknote Company. Sun Yat Sen and Chinese inscriptions are on the fronts and English is on the backs.
Item PM-CN-SET3 CHINA 3 NOTE SET: 5 & 10 CUSTOMS GOLD UNITES, 100 YUAN 1930-1940 FINE $19.50


WWII ERA JAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY 

5 Yen WWII era Japanese Military Currency for use in China and Hong Kong
Japan introduced this Military Note in 1938 for use in the areas of China that they had occupied.  The note was created by taking partially completed Japanese homeland notes and overprinting them on the front and back with four large red characters that read "Military Note".  In 1940 the Military Notes were replaced by notes issued by the Japanese puppet banks in China, however the Military Yen continued to be used in Hong Kong and Hainan Island throughout the war.   We have available both the 5 Yen and 10 Yen Military currency notes.
Item PM-CN-M5Y JAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY FOR CHINA, 5 YEN, 1938-44 PM25 VF $15.00
 Item PM-CN-M10Y JAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY FOR CHINA, 10 YEN, 1938 PM27 VG $6.00

NEWHIGH GRADE WWII JAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY FOR HONG KONG

World War II Japanese Military 100 Yen note
This Crisp Uncirculated 100 Yen Japanese Military Currency note was issued in 1945 for use in Hong Kong.  It was the highest denomination military currency issued by Japan. The note, apparently printed in Hong Kong, utilized the basic design of the 1944 Japanese homeland 100 Yen note, however with modified legends on the back and the front was overprinted with the characters indicating it is military currency.  
Item PM-CN-100Y JAPANESE MILITARY CURRENCY FOR HONG KONG 100 YEN 1945 PM30 UNC. $9.00


COIN SET FROM THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA  Restocked

People's Republic of China coin set
This unpackaged five coin set from The People's Republic of China includes the 1, 2 and 5 Fen, 1 and 5 Jiao dating from 1987 to 1996. One side of the coins show the national emblem featuring the Tiananmen Gate and the entrance to The Forbidden City. The Forbidden City was the former Imperial Palace that was closed to the public. It is now a vast museum and a major tourist attraction. Above the gate are 5 stars. The reverse of the coins features the denomination. All 5 coins are Uncirculated.
Item CN-SET5 PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA COIN SET $3.00


2015 CHINA SILVER PANDA

China 2015 1 ounce .999 fine silver Panda 10 Yuan coinEach year The People's Republic of China produces the beautiful and popular one troy ounce .999 fine silver Panda coin.  Each year features a different design. Their cute, well executed and detailed designs have made them popular with both collectors and investors. The coin has the nominal value of 10 Yuan.  The 2015 issue features a Giant Panda munching on a sprig of bamboo.  Both frosted and bright fields are used to create an impressive and attractive coin. The other side pictures the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, a Taoist temple complex constructed in the early 1400's.  The Brilliant Uncirculated 40mm coin comes in its original protective capsule. 
CN-PANDA15 CHINA 2015 1 OUNCE SILVER PANDA, BU $32.00



NEWMACAO COIN SET

Macao coin set: 10 Avos - 5 PatacasThe former Portuguese colony of Macao (Macau) is now a Special Administrative Region of China.   These coins reflect the mix of Chinese and Portuguese culture in Macao. This six coin set includes the 10 Avos to the 5 Patacas.  The 2007 5 Patacas depicts the ruins of St. Paul's Church and a Chinese Junk. The Church, built between 1602 and 1640 was the largest Catholic Church in Asia at that time. It was destroyed by a fire during a typhoon in 1835 and never rebuilt.  The 1998 2 Pataca portrays the Penha Church and the A-Ma Temple.  The Penha Church, founded in 1622, is a point of pilgramage for sailors embarking on a dangerous voyage.  The A-Ma temple was built five centuries ago.   A-Ma was an attractive woman who could calm stormy seas and protect fishermen.  The 2007 1 Pataca features the Guia Lighthouse and the Chapel of Our Lady of Guia, located in the Guia Fortress.  The fortress dates back to at least 1622.   The lighthouse, completed in 1865, is the oldest lighthouse on the Chinese coast.  The brass 10,20 and 50 Avos coins depict dancers in the Lion Dance and Dragon Dance festivals.
Item MO-SET6 MACAO 6 COIN SET 10 AVOS - 5 PATACAS 1993-2007 UNC.  $12.50


Also see:

Click HereJAPANESE OCCUPATION OF MANCHUKUO
Click HereWWII FIBER COIN OF JAPANESE OCCUPIED MANCHUKUO
Click HereMENG CHIANG JAPANESE PUPPET BANK
Click Here COINS OF TIBET


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All items are guaranteed to be genuine, unless clearly indicated otherwise.
NOTE:  All pictures are of a typical item taken from stock.  Because we have multiples of most items, the item you receive may not look exactly the same, however it will be as described.

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Joel Anderson
PO Box 365
Grover Beach, CA 93483-0365
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Phone 1 805 489 8045  Fax 1 805 299 1818
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