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AFGHANISTAN COINS & BANKNOTES

A numismatic review of a troubled land.

For coins of India, please visit Click Here2200 YEARS OF COINS OF INDIA
For coins of Iraq,  please visit Click Here1800 YEARS OF IRAQ COINS & CURRENCY
For coins of other countries of the Middle East, please visit our Click HereMIDDLE EAST COINS PAGE

ALSO SEE:
Click HereTHE BEY BUD TANKA OF TIMURID SULTAN HUSAYN



COINS OF THE KIDARITES

Kidarite copper coins, circa 350-500ADThe Kidarites were nomadic Huns that conquered the Kushano-Sassanians sometime around 350AD.  They are sometime referred to as the “Red Huns”.  Very little is known about them.  They controlled an area that now is made up of parts of northern Afghanistan, northern Pakistan, as well as parts of TajikistanUzabkistan and Turkmenistan. . They ruled the region until about 500AD. The Kidarites appear to have been a confederacy of warlords, many of whom issued coins.  Not having had a tradition of coinage, they copied the basic designs and fabric of the coins they found in circulation without an apparent understanding of the meaning of the designs. Some of the coins are modeled on Sassanian or Kushano-Sassanian coins depicting the bust of the king and a fire altar.  Other coins are modeled after Kushan or other Indian coins and feature various deities or a standing king. There is a wide variety of extremely crude and primitive Kidarite copper coins.  These scarce, crude Kidarite copper coins are unusual pieces from a little know Hunnic tribe.
Item KIDARx1 KIDARITE COPPER UNIT, circa 350-500AD, CRUDE  $5.00
Item KIDARx5 5 of the above KIDARITE COPPER UNIT, circa 350-500AD, CRUDE  $18.00
Item KIDARx100 100 of the above KIDARITE COPPER UNIT, circa 350-500AD, CRUDE  $195.00


LAST COIN OF THE GHAZNAVID EMPIRE

Ghaznavids, Khusrau Malik, 1160-1186AD Jita, Lahore Mint, Tye 119The Ghaznavid Empire was founded in 975AD by Turkish slave soldiers.  At its peak it ruled an area that now consists of parts of Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan and north-west India. It grew wealthy due to its trading position on the Silk Road and regular raids into India.  By the time Sultan Khusrau Malik came to power in 1160 it was in serious decline. It lost its territory in Central Asia and Iran and eventually lost its capital city of Ghazi to Turkish and Ghorid invaders.  Khusrau Malik then moved the capital to Lahore.  Lahore was initially spared from the Ghorid invaders when Khusrau Malik paid them bypass the city, however the Ghorids eventually laid siege to the city.  In 1186 he was captured by the Ghorids on a ruse.  They promised to release his son who had earlier been taken hostage.  Instead they captured him as soon as he left the safety of his fort; bringing an end to Ghaznavid rule.  The 15mm bronze Jital was minted for Khusrau Malik in Lahore.  One side features an extremely crude line drawing of a Brahma bull.  The other side has inscriptions.  This inexpensive coin is the sad end of a once rich and glorious empire.
Item GAHZ-KH GHAZNAVID, KHUSRAU MALIK, 1160-86AD JITAL Tye 119 F-VF $5.00
Item GAHZ-KHx10 10 of the above GHAZNAVID, KHUSRAU MALIK JITALS F-VF $25.00


NEWMEDIEVAL SILVER COIN OF THE SHAHIS OF KABUL

Shahis of Kabul, silver Bull & Horseman type Jital, circa 950ADThe Shahi’s were a rich Hindu dynasty ruling parts of what is now Afghanistan and Pakistan. About 750AD they introduced a new silver coin, called a Jital.  One side showed a recumbent Brahma bull, a traditional symbol of the Hinduism. The other pictured a man on a horse holding a shield and a lance, reflecting the Afghans love of fine horsemanship. As each generation copied the design from the coins found in circulation, the images became extremely crude, looking like something a young child might draw.  Despite the dynasty’s collapse about 1000AD, the Bull and Horseman design continued to be struck in India and Pakistan for hundreds of years though becoming increasingly crude and debased. These crude, undated, medieval Bull and Horseman silver Jitals were made by the Shahis of Kabul approximately 950AD. Compared to contemporary medieval European coins which sell for hundreds of dollars, they are quite a bargain!
SHAHI SHAHIS OF KABUL SILVER JITAL, circa 950AD VG-F-Crude $19.50



THE LAST KING OF AFGHANISTAN 

Afghanistan 5 Afghani 1961 portrait of Muhammad Zahir Shah Muhammad Zahir Shah, the last king of Afghanistan, appears on this 5 Afghani coin.  The 29mm nickel-clad steel is dated SH1340 and AH1381 (AD1961).  It is the only coin which bears his portrait and was one of the last coins struck by the Kingdom of Afghanistan. Because Islam discourages the use of images of people or living creatures, the coin was not well received and many were mutilated or destroyed.   In 1973 the king was overthrown.  Since then the country has lurched from civil war to civil war.
AF-5AF AFGHANISTAN 5 AFGHANI 1961 KM955 ;UNC. $4.00




SCARCE BANKNOTES OF THE SHORT-LIVED REPUBLIC OF AFGHANISTAN

Afghanistan 1000 Afghani note of Mohammad Daoud Khan 1973-1978
In 1973 Muhammad Daud Khan (also known as Mohammad Daoud Khan) overthrew his cousin and brother-in-law, the king of Afghanistan, and declared himself President of Afghanistan.  Though he did not claim the title of the Shah, he retained many of the Shah's powers. He initiated a number of progressive policies, including the expansion of the rights of women.  He suppressed the radical Islamic fundamentalists, whose leaders found refuge in Pakistan and who were supported encouraged by the Pakistan government.  Though initially aligned with the Soviet Union, he began to push for increased relations and trade with other Muslim nations  and the United States.   In 1978, he was assassinated in a coup that was supported by the Soviet Union, which was afraid of losing its influence over Afghanistan.  This six note set of Muhammad Daud Khan includes the 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 Afghani dating between 1973 and 1977. The notes all bear his portrait on the left, and a watermark of him on the right.  The reverses of the notes features various Afghan vignettes.   The 10 Afghanis pictures the Arch at Qila'e Bost.  The 20 Afghanis shows a scene of Kabul featuring a canal.  The 50 Afghani features 3 men riding yaks.   The 100 Afghani features the Friday Mosque in Herat.  The 500 Afghani features a fortified village and is brown.  The 1000 Afghani features the Mosque of Mazar-e Sharif.  The lower denominations are AU- Uncirculated, the higher denominations are VF to AU.  The set catalogs for over $40, however our price is MUCH less.
Item PM-AF-DAUD6 AFGHANISTAN 6 NOTE SET 10-1000 AFGHANIS, 1973-77, ( P47-50,52-53) VF-UNC. $17.50



BANKNOTES FROM SOVIET OCCUPIED & TALIBAN AFGHANISTAN Restocked

Set of 6 colorful Afghanistan notes issued during Soviet Occupation and Talaban rule, 50 to 10,000 Afghani, P57-58, P60-63
This set of 6 attractive Afghanistan banknotes were introduced between 1978 and 1993, during the Soviets occupation of Afghanistan.  The higher denominations continued to be issued by the Taliban until they were finally replaced in 2001 after the United States invasion of Afghanistan.  The set includes the 50, 100 and 500, 1000, 5000 and 10000 Afghani notes in crisp uncirculated condition.  The 50 Afghani pictures the Dar-al-Aman palace in Kabul.  The 100 Afghani depicts a farmer and a hydroelectric dam.  The 500 Afghani pictures a group of horseman.  The 1000 Afghani depicts a flock of birds at the Mazar-e-Sharif Mosque on one side.  The other side pictures the Victory Arch, built to commemorate Afghan victory over the British in 1919.  The 5000 Afghani pictures a mosque on one side and the tomb of King Habdullah on the other.  A pair of minarets and a gateway are on the 10,000 Afghani note.  
Item PM-AF-TAL6 AFGHANISTAN 6 NOTE SET: 50 - 10,000 AFGHANI, 1979-93 (P57-58,60-63) UNC. $11.00

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